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I Have This Old Gun: British Snider Enfield

Watch this American Rifleman Television segment of "I Have This Old Gun" from 2020 to learn about the British Snider Enfield.

This Old Gun: Winchester Model 1892 'Trapper'

The Winchester 1873 may have been “The Gun That Won The West,” but it was the Winchester Model 1892, with its smoother, stronger action, that soon began outselling the earlier toggle-link lever-action and eventually caused the ‘73’s demise in 1921.

I Have This Old Gun: Remington Autoloading Shotgun

Watch this American Rifleman Television segment of "I Have This Old Gun" from 2020 to learn about the John Moses Browning designed Remington Autoloading Shotgun.

I Have This Old Gun: U.S. M1918 BAR

Watch this American Rifleman Television segment of "I Have This Old Gun" from 2020 to learn about the U.S. M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle in .30-'06 Sprg.

This Old Gun: Colt Model 1877 Lightning Revolver

Colt’s Model 1877 Lightning revolver (occasionally confused with its 1884 Lightning pump-action rifle) was the company’s first double-action handgun, brought out to compete with the double-action British bulldog revolvers gaining in popularity at the time.

I Have This Old Gun: Ruger's Red Label

Watch this American Rifleman Television segment of "I Have This Old Gun" from 2020 to learn about the Ruger's Red Label over-under shotgun line.

This Old Gun: Winchester Model 1890

Even though almost 850,000 Model 1890 rifles in various .22 rimfire calibers were manufactured between 1890 and 1932 (retail was $16 until 1917), only a handful remain in this type of superior original condition.

I Have This Old Gun: Remington Model 32

Watch this American Rifleman Television segment of "I Have This Old Gun" from 2020 to learn about the Remington Model 32 shotgun.

This Old Gun: Finnish-Capture SVT-40

More than 1.5 million SVT-40s were manufactured between 1940 and 1945, making it second only to the M1 Garand as World War II’s most-prolifically produced semi-automatic service rifle. Following the war, it was quickly replaced in Soviet service by the SKS and AK-47.

This Old Gun: U.S. Model Of 1842 Musket

By the latter part of the 1830s, most of the major powers finally let practicality overcome economy, realizing that it was time to switch their small arms over from flintlock to percussion. Britain and France were among the earliest, with the United States following suit in short order—the Americans fielding the handsome Model of 1842.

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