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Review: Steyr AUG A3 M1

The A3 M1 of the Steyr AUG is available in two stock varieties—the traditional version and a STANAG magazine-compatible model.

Handloads: 6.5x54mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer

The previous owner of my 6.5 carbine bought another cocking piece and had a gunsmith screw a Williams aperture sight on top, making the rifle more friendly to older eyes.

I Have This Old Gun: Model 1895 Mannlicher Rifle

The Model 1895 Austro-Hungarian straight-pull infantry rifle was something of an anomaly. In the usual order of things, an ordnance board was more inclined to first develop an arm for its foot troops and then one for the mounted service.

Long-Lived Excitement with Short-Range Game

Keeping anticipation in the hunt can be accomplished several ways.

Infantry Rifles of The Great War: Enfields, Berthiers, Mannlichers and Mosin-Nagants

Watch this feature segment on the "Guns of August" from a recent episode of American Rifleman TV.

The 1903 Mannlicher-Schoenauer Carbine

“A gun is to shoot anyway, he thought, not to be preserved in a case, and this was a really good rifle, easy to shoot, easy to teach anyone to shoot with, and handy on the boat. He had always had more confidence shooting it, as to being able to place his shots at close and moderate range, than any other rifle he had ever owned and it made him happy to pull it out of the case now and pull back the bolt and shove a shell into the breech.” —Ernest Hemingway, Islands in the Stream

The History of the Mannlicher-Schoenauer Carbine

By the time Hemingway got his hands on a Mannlicher-Schoenauer in 1930, the rifle’s basic design was nearly half-a-century old, its roots going back to one of the first turnbolt rifle designs, the Dreyse Needle Gun.

Steyr AUG/A3 M1

The A3 M1 is available in two stock varieties—the traditional version, which uses Steyr’s proprietary “waffle-style” polymer magazines, and the NATO version, which accepts the widely available STANAG magazines.

Handloading the 6.5x54 mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer

The previous owner of my 6.5 carbine bought another cocking piece and had a gunsmith screw a Williams aperture sight on top, making the rifle more friendly to older eyes.

The Most Famous Rifle Of D-Day … Wasn’t There?

When Lord Lovat led his British Commandos into Normandy on June 6, 1944, he carried his trademark Mannlicher-Shoenauer carbine across Sword Beach, right? Not so fast. Here's what he really carried.

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