Subsonic 9 mm Luger

Handloads: Simple, Reliable, Subsonic 9 mm Luger

Subsonic 9 mm Luger ammunition often fetches a premium across the gun counter, despite how simple it is to make. The key is to couple heavy bullets with a powder that burns with enough intensity to cycle the action, yet not so hot that it launches the projectile into the supersonic range.

Handloads: A .338 Win. Mag. For Elk

Arguments never end about which cartridges are adequate for the hunting of elk. Nobody has ever said, however, that a bullet fired from a .338 Win. Mag. lacks enough power for that task.

Loading Bench: Rifle Loads For The .44 Remington Magnum

The variety of available bullet weights and styles make the .44 Mag. a versatile cartridge, and a rifle with a relatively fast rifling twist can accurately fire all of them. Read on:

Handloads: A Light-Recoiling .32 ACP Practice Round

There are still more than 1 million pistols in circulation chambered for the .32 ACP, although, today, it is generally considered to be an outdated defensive cartridge.

5 Ways To Ruin A Good Handload

With as much as there is to gain from loading your own ammunition loads, there are also plenty of ways to get it wrong. Follow Frank Melloni as he covers five of the most common ways your could ruin your handloads.

Handloads: An Easy-Recoiling 8 mm Mauser

Most Americans identify it simply as the 8 mm Mauser, but it has also been referred to as 7.92x57 mm Mauser, 8x57 mm Mauser, 8x57 mm JS and 8x57 mm S.

Loading Bench: Hit The Mark, Weather Or Not

Years ago, hunters rarely considered that the propellant they handloaded into their rifle cartridges could cause enough of a swing in velocity between shooting during the summer heat and the winter cold that it might cause them to miss their targets and/or game at extended distances.

Handloads: 6.5 mm PRC For Big Game

The 6.5 mm PRC boasts higher velocities and more downrange energy than the 6.5 mm Creedmoor, and with the proper projectile, this cartridge can humanely dispatch big game, even at extended distances.

Handloads: 16 Gauge Spreader Load

Not that long ago, sporting goods store shelves contained an adequate selection of 16-ga. shells. The last few years, however, barely a box of any 16-ga. shells can be found anywhere. But that’s of little concern to those with a shotshell-reloading press, such as the MEC 600 Jr., close at hand.

5 Tips For Better Handloads

Although people get into handloading for many different reasons, the most common one is to save money. Here are five recommendations on how to save when developing loads.

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