Morgan Modern M1 Use05

Unexpected Longevity: Foreign Use of the M1 Garand

More than eight decades after its invention, the M1 Garand rifle continues to see use today fir both ceremonial and combat by foreign nations and militant groups across the globe.

'Tanker Garands': The Real Story

Most “Tanker Garands” were made for commercial sale, but a few are genuine. This is their story.

Wartime Winchesters

In its advertisements on the back page of this magazine during World War II, Winchester touted the company as having been “On Guard for America Since 1866.” This was never more true than when it produced arms and ammunition to help defeat Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan.

D-Day + 75: Arms of the Airborne

Seventy-five years ago, Allied troops invaded Hitler’s “Fortress Europe” to bring an end to Nazi tyranny, and many of them arrived by parachute or glider. They were the men of the British and American airborne, and they were well-armed indeed.

American Rifleman Special Presentations Set For Dallas

At the NRA Annual Meeting & Exhibits in Dallas, American Rifleman will host six Special Presentations, with Maj. John L. Plaster headlining with “Snipers In World War II.”

Rifleman Q & A: Shootin’ Blanks

A reader inquires about a problem that occurs when firing a clip of blank cartridges in his M1 rifle.

Garands In The King's­ Service

In the dark days of World War II, when Britain faced Hitler’s war machine alone, the United States sent M1 Garand rifles to help the beleaguered island nation. Long disdained by collectors, “Lend-Lease” Garands have now come into their own.

Winchester Goes To War

Throughout this century, Winchester has been called upon to be a vital part of the ”Arsenal of Democracy.” Though not as well regarded as its commercial guns, the firm’s military arms served our servicemen and women well in both World Wars.

7.62x51 mm NATO U.S. Navy Garand Rifles

With the U.S. Army and Marine Corps receiving the bulk of early M14 rifle production, the Navy chose to convert .30-’06 Sprg. M1 Garands to 7.62x51 mm NATO, extending the service life of John Garand’s masterpiece.

Garand Name Pronunciation: Who’s Right?

Q. I watch “American Rifleman Television” and hear Mark Keefe and Michael Parker pronounce the name “Garand” like “Ger-und” and in the same show someone else will pronounce it like I do, which is “Guh-rand.” What’s the deal? Are those two misspeaking every week?

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