150 Years Of The Colt Single Action Army

150 Years Of The Colt Single Action Army

Initially developed as a dedicated sidearm for the U.S. military, the Colt Single Action Army became iconic as one of the tools that tamed the frontier and embodied the spirit of the American West.

The Interarms G33/50: A Shootable Swedish Cavalry Carbine

Chambered for the light recoiling and readily available 6.5 mm Swedish cartridge, and with fine build and  finish quality, The InterArms Co. G33/50 carbine is an excellent choice for collectors who want a bolt-action surplus rifle to shoot.

New For 2022: Cimarron Firearms U.S. Cavalry 1873 Henry Nettleton Revolver

Cimarron Firearms is now offering a detailed reproduction of the rare and sought-after First Generation Colt Single Action Army inspected by Henry Nettleton.

Cavalry Arms Of The American Revolution

When well-trained and equipped, a determined light horseman of the American Revolution was a fearsome combined-arms foe.

The U.S. Model 1855 Pistol Carbine

Adopted alongside the U.S. Model 1855 Rifle and Rifle-Musket, the Model 1855 Pistol Carbine mated a shoulder stock to a big-bore handgun. While soon rendered obsolete by better carbines, such as the Sharps, the M1855s saw service against the Apache and Cheyenne and in the American Civil War.

Colt's Model 1855 Revolving Rifle in the Civil War

Though eclipsed by other repeaters—such as the Henry and Spencer—the rifle version of Col. Colt’s percussion revolver saw field service with Yankee forces throughout America’s bloodiest conflict.

I Have This Old Gun: British Pattern 1856 Cavalry Carbine

As the British military modernized its arsenal in the mid-19th century, the Pattern 1856 Cavalry Carbine joined the iconic Pattern 1853 Enfield in frontline service.

This Old Gun: Martini-Henry Cavalry Carbine

In the 1860s, at the dawn of the self-contained metallic cartridge era, the military armsmakers of Great Britain and other major powers decided to alter existing muzzleloading rifle-muskets into breechloaders. Reasons included saving production costs and buying time to permit experimentation.

Book Review—The Colt Model 1860 Army Revolver

Author Charles W. Pate has again provided the gun collecting community with another remarkable tome, this time on the most popular revolver of the Civil War era.

Back To Basics: Holsters

The term “holster” dates back to somewhere in the mid-17th century. Its origins are a combination of Dutch, Old English and German.

Page 1 of 2

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.