Thompson

Rifleman Q&A: U.S. Model Of 1928 Thompson Variants

I was reading an auction catalog, and a reference was made to an American military Thompson submachine gun. It stated it was a “1928 Colt Navy overstamp, not a Savage.” The catalog made that verbiage seem important. What’s the significance of the “overstamp,” and were there other military 1928 Thompsons besides the Navy guns?

'Limited Standard': The M1919A6 Machine Gun

The U.S. M1919A6 machine gun was a modification of the M1919A4 intended to give a single trooper comparable firepower in a lighter-weight package. It was a compromise gun, and like many such designs, it could not do everything well.

Rifleman Q&A: M1903 vs. M1903A1 Rifles

I’ve seen references to an M1903A1 rifle. I’ve looked around at a bunch of gun shows, and I have not found a rifle marked “M1903A1.” How does that variant differ from a standard M1903 rifle?

Rifleman Q&A: M1911 Cartridge Catcher

Q: I came across this photo of an M1911 pistol fitted with some sort of metal cage, presumably to catch the fired cartridge cases. Can you shed any light on this item?

The UD M.’42 Submachine Gun: A Clandestine Tool For The OSS

Far less familiar than the Thompson or the Reising, the U.S.-made UD M.’42 submachine gun was still a factor for the OSS and French resistance fighters operating behind enemy lines during World War II.

The Boys Anti-Tank Rifle In U.S. Service

The Boys rifle saw service with U.S. Marine Raiders during the Makin Island Raid of Aug. 17 and 18, 1942. “Carlson’s Raiders” used their Boys rifles to dispatch two Japanese float planes. It was likely an unenviable task to lug the massive bolt-action through the jungle.

Rifleman Q&A: Needham Conversion

Is my gun an Allin conversion or does it have a different name?

Rifleman Q&A: 1900 Test Luger & Holster

I have a question about a Rock Island Arsenal holster stamped “E.H.S.” that contains a 1900 Eagle Test Luger serial No. 70XX.

The Ward-Burton Rifle: America's First Military Bolt-Action

During the U.S. military’s search for a breechloading rifle design in the years after the Civil War, America’s first military bolt-action was deemed both novel and sometimes dangerous.

Rifleman Q&A: Augusta Arsenal M1A1 Rework

My question concerns the arsenal stamping “AAL” on the left side above the pistol grip. “AA” should stand for Augusta Arsenal, but what does the “L” signify?

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