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Rifleman Q&A: Custom M1903 Carbine?

From the archives of American Rifleman, after spotting an unusual gun in a World War II-era photograph one NRA member writes the editors with questions about the U.S. military's use of cut-down M1903 Springfield rifles.

Rifleman Q&A: ’03 Springfield Sight Settings

From the American Rifleman archives, NRA member writes Dope Bag questioning adjusting the M1905 adjustable sight issued with the U.S. Caliber .30-06, Model 1903 Springfield rifle.

Rifleman Q&A: Finding A USMC Model 1941 Johnson Rifle

Melvin Johnson believed Garand's mainstream design to be flawed and reasoned that a handier gun might appeal to the Dutch. His unique M1941 rifle went on to inspire the likes of Eugene stoner, among others, yet garnered very little U.S. military acceptance at the time.

Rifleman Q&A: CMP M1903A3 Sling Modifications?

Before government-issued firearms returned to U.S. shores, ultimately making their way to the Civilian Marksmanship Program, featured various modifications, and our latest "Questions & Answers" covers M1903A3 sling-swivel modifications.

The International Harvester M1 Garand: A New Rifle For The Nuclear Age

Of the four manufacturers contracted by the U.S. Government to produce the M1 rifle, International Harvester was the least obvious of the choices.

The Krag-Jorgensen: America's First Bolt-Action Service Rifle

The U.S. Krag-Jorgensen was America’s first bolt-action repeater chambered for a smokeless-powder cartridge. In the hands of American troops around the globe, the Krag played a small, but key, role in the rise of the “American Century.”

Valuable Service: The U.S. Model Of 1917 Revolvers

Swept into World War I in April 1917, the U.S. military desperately needed .45 ACP handguns. Both Colt and Smith & Wesson had existing revolver designs adopted as the Model of 1917, and they would go on to serve again during World War II.

Rifleman Q&A: What Does My Garand Stock Stamp Mean?

Q: I have an M1 Garand rifle that has “SA/EMcF” on the left side of the stock. Is the marking from the inspection process, and is it possible to know who approved my rifle?

The 'Trench Gun' In World War I

During World War I American “Doughboys” went “over the top” with a fearsome, distinctly American arm—the trench shotgun.

Rifleman Q&A: When Did M1 Carbines Get Bayonet Lugs?

I recently purchased an M1 carbine manufactured by Quality Hardware that has a bayonet lug. Is this part original to the gun or was it added later?

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