Shotgunbarrel Illustration

Understanding Shotgun Barrels: Breech To Muzzle

Most of us take the inside of our shotgun barrels for granted. That may be because shotgun barrels today are better than they have ever been. Here’s why.

Rifleman Q&A: Finding A USMC Model 1941 Johnson Rifle

Melvin Johnson believed Garand's mainstream design to be flawed and reasoned that a handier gun might appeal to the Dutch. His unique M1941 rifle went on to inspire the likes of Eugene stoner, among others, yet garnered very little U.S. military acceptance at the time.

Rifleman Q&A: Number Of Turns To Focus A Scope?

From the archives of American Rifleman, read about ocular-ring adjustments on riflescopes from the July 2004 magazine.

Review: Smith & Wesson SW99

Two of the world’s best handgun makers―one from the “Old” and one from the “New”―have partnered to make one of the best semi-autos of all time: the SW99.

Rifleman Q&A: An Auger Gun In The Civil War?

From the archives of American Rifleman, read about Wilson Ager's "Coffee Mill Gun" from the June 2004 magazine.

The .500 S&W Magnum: Most Powerful Handgun Round In The World

In 2002, Smith & Wesson developed the .500 S&W Magnum, the most powerful handgun round in the world. Here's how it was done.

Handgunning in the 1920s: The Techniques of W.E. Fairbairn

William Ewart Fairbairn—best known for the Fairbairn-Sykes fighting knife—was one of the pioneers of gunfighting with the “one-hand gun.” In this article, Fairbairn sets out the philosophy and techniques he developed when he was with the Shanghai Police.

Archives: The Marines Have Landed ... on Paper Too!

These Marine Corps artists who fight first, then draw what they see and feel, provide a telling ... .

Archives: Britain’s "New" Rifle

From the American Rifleman archives we learn about the No. 4 Mk I, which was developed when Britain had a limited budget and war was on the horizon.

Archives: The M1911A1 and The M9

From the 1985 American Rifleman, shortly after the adoption of the M9 as the new U.S. Army's sidearm, then-Editor-in-Chief Pete Dickey compares it to the M1911.

Page 1 of 4

Interests



Subscribe to the NRA American Rifleman newsletter