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The U.S.S. LST 393: World War II U.S. Navy Tank Landing Ship

Now in Muskegon, Mich. as a museum ship, U.S.S. LST 393 once served as a specialized landing ship for the United States Navy, delivering thousands of troops and vehicles from the coast of Sicily to the shores of Normandy during D-day.

Lord Lovat's Rifles: In Film, Recollection and Reality

The most famous rifle of D-Day—or at least the most memorable rifle of “The Longest Day”—wasn’t actually there. Lord Lovat did carry his Mannlicher-Schoenauer carbine in combat, however, and we can learn a lot about British and American guns used during World War II from his memoirs.

5 Amazing Artifacts in the National Museum of the U.S. Army

The National Museum of the United States Army holds nearly 1,400 artifacts that tell the story of the fighting men and women of America through the ages.

'This Is It!': American Rifleman at D-Day

Following the D-Day landings on June 6, 1944, American Rifleman editor Bill Shadel wrote a letter describing his experience during the battle on the Normandy coast.

D-Day's Forgotten Guns: 12 Firearms Used in June 1944

We all know about the M1 Garand and the Thompson submachine gun, but troops in Normandy used much more. See these 12 forgotten guns of the D-Day landings.

MKS Supply Offers D-Day Commemorative Combat Shotgun

Each shotgun comes with a certificate of authenticity denoting the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings with the shotgun's serial number imprinted on the certificate.

Archives: The U.S. M3 Submachine Gun

The American Rifleman staff had an early and up- close look at the then-new M3 submachine gun. Not long thereafter, the “Grease Gun” would make its combat debut with the American Airborne in Normandy.

The Keefe Report: D-Day + 75—Day of Days

Now 75 years after the event, Operation Overlord-Neptune, better known as D-Day, we must remember in many ways.

Auto-Ordnance D-Day Commemoratives

Auto-Ordnance is commemorating the 75th anniversary of D-Day with three specially engraved and ornamented guns—an M1911, an M1 carbine and a Thompson.

The Keefe Report: 2nd Lt. Kelso C. Horne

This is a very special issue for several reasons. If you look on this month’s cover you’ll find a photograph by Bob Landry, taken about a week after D-Day, of a young soldier in the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division.

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