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The History of the .357 Magnum

There are lighter .357 Mag. revolvers to pack and more powerful, finely made revolvers to hunt with, but there will always be a place for an accurate, premium-built revolver with the power of the .357 Mag.

Hangin’ In: The .41 Magnum

For sheer perserverence in the face of adversity, you can’t beat the grand old .41 Magnum. Although this so-called “middle magnum” was never on the top of the heap in revolver cartridge popularity, it stoutly withstood repeated efforts to cancel it out. This business of a revolver that was not just a supplement to the sporting rifle, started with the .357 Mag. in 1935.

Magnum Research MLR .22 WMR Barracuda

Shortly after Sturm, Ruger & Co.’s 1999 introduction of its .22 WMR-chambered Model 10/22 Magnum, Magnum Research, Inc., rolled out its U.S.-made Magnum Lite Rifle (MLR) in the same chambering.

Magnum Autos Revisited

When I took up the subject of a magnum semi-automatic pistol a while back, I must have failed in my efforts to get one point firmly established.

The .17 HMR: History and Performance

Since 2002, the .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire cartridge has developed a cult following for both its high velocity and accuracy potential, all in a light-recoiling package.

The Taurus Judge vs. The Magnum Research BFR

How do these two .410 handguns stack up for self-defense?

Throwback Thursday: Capabilities of Magnums

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the American Rifleman archives. In this article from May 1965, the author explains the determination and calculation of factors important to the effectiveness of rifle-ammunition combinations.

Handloads: .300 Winchester Short Magnum

Federal’s new Terminal Ascent bullet traces its origin to the Trophy Bonded Bear Claw developed by Jack Carter back in 1985, with a front lead core bonded to a solid shank of copper.

Magnum Autos

We live in a time of fast-moving innovation. Applied technology has conditioned us to believe that anything is possible.

.357 or .357

In past years, various writing projects have caused me to research a couple of cartridges with similar sounding names—the .357 Mag. and the .357 Sig.

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