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A Look Back At The Mauser C96

At first look, the Mauser C96 seems as ungainly as a newborn colt. Its weight and bulk hardly lends itself to any modern notion of a carry gun, but a closer inspection reveals a gracefulness in construction no longer seen in today’s pistols.

The Mauser C96: A Look Back

In this installment of "A Look Back," we're checking out the Mauser C96 "Broomhandle," one of the earliest semi-automatic handguns.

I Have This Old Gun: Karabiner 98AZ

In this American Rifleman TV segment of "I Have This Old Gun," we take a look at the history and development of the Mauser designed Karabiner Model 98AZ carbine chambered in 8 mm Mauser and used in large numbers by Imperial Germany towards the end of World War I.

Model 1898 Mauser

The benchmark used to measure bolt-action rifles.

Mauser Kar. 98k Receiver Codes

Factory codes for the Mauser Kar. 98k went through several changes during the design’s production run. Find out more here.

Where Have All the Mausers Gone?

Wiley Clapp says he hasn't seen a Chinese Mausers for many years. Was the market for them so big that they have all disappeared into safes?

I Have This Old Gun: Mauser 98 Standard Modell “Banner” Rifle

It’s one of the most famous trademarks in the firearm world—a rectangular banner with “Mauser” at its center. The company started using the logo in 1909, and it appeared on such famous guns as C96 “Broomhandle” pistols, interwar Oberndorf sporting rifles and on an export rifle called the “Standard Modell,” which would become known in collecting circles as the “Mauser Banner.”

A Look Back at the Mauser Model 1898 Rifle

The vast majority of bolt-action rifles on the market today can trace much of their lineage to Paul Mauser’s Model 1898 rifle.

The 'Banner' Mauser: Model 98 Standard Modell

Mauser's famous rectangular banner logo, first used in 1909, appeared on an export rifle called the “Standard Modell,” which would become known in collecting circles as the “Mauser Banner.”

The Belgian Model 1889 Mauser: The Rifle That Saved Paris

The modern, clip-loaded Model 1889 Mauser chambered in 7.65x53 mm was used by Belgian troops to slow down the German onslaught in 1914. It was superior Belgian marksmanship and the Model 1889 that gave the French and British time to pull off the "Miracle of the Marne."

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