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Gallery: D-Day +70: The Men and Guns of the Battle for Normandy

As we commemorate the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings, we look back at the infantry arms-both well known and forgotten-used on this pivotal "Day of Days" in American history. (Photos courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration/U.S. Army Signal Corps)

Automatic Pistol, Caliber .30, Model of 1918

Officially adopted in the midst of our involvement in WWI, the Pedersen device was kept secret.

U.S. Nomenclature

An American Rifleman reader inquires about the nomenclature for the bolt-action Springfield rifle.

Gallery: D-Day +70: The Men and Guns of the Battle for Normandy

As we commemorate the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings, we look back at the infantry arms-both well known and forgotten-used on this pivotal "Day of Days" in American history. (Photos courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration/U.S. Army Signal Corps)

The Remington M1903 Rifles

Though not as well known as the Springfield and Rock Island ’03s, the more than 1 million M1903-based rifles made by Remington Arms Co. during World War II included the primary U.S. sniping rifle of that epic conflict.

Doughboy Sniper Rifles

The ’03 Springfield, fitted with telescopic sights and fired by American soldiers and Marines, was the scourge of “No Man’s Land” during World War I.

Never In Anger: The Pedersen Device

Though never used in combat, the innovative Pedersen Device was a potential solution to the horrors of trench warfare and a tribute to the genius of its designer.

Remember Pearl Harbor: The Men and the Guns

On Dec. 7, 1941, a “date which will live in infamy,” Americans fought back against the Japanese sneak attack with guns ranging from the M1911A1 pistol to the ’03 Springfield rifle, and most effectively, with machine guns designed by John Moses Browning.

Guns of the “Devil Dogs”: U.S. Marine Corps Small Arms Of World War I

The U.S. Marines in France would earn the name “Teufelshunde” or “Devil Dogs” from the Germans they faced. The Marines fought five major battles during World War I, mostly with the same small arms used by the U.S. Army, but with a few exceptions.

Blood on the Border: The Battle of Columbus

In the early hours of March 19, 1916, American cavalrymen and armed citizens fought a pitched battle against Pancho Villa’s raiders.

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