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Winchester Wildcat 22 SR: A 21st Century Rimfire

This handy little suppressor-ready rimfire carbine is loaded with features and was thoughtfully engineered to tackle the top three challenges of keeping a .22 running reliably.

Rifleman Q&A: What Does My Garand Stock Stamp Mean?

Q: I have an M1 Garand rifle that has “SA/EMcF” on the left side of the stock. Is the marking from the inspection process, and is it possible to know who approved my rifle?

The Remington-Lee Rifle: Ahead of Its Time

Today, the detachable box magazine is part of virtually every military rifle, but there was a time when it was just an idea in the fertile mind of inventor James Paris Lee. The Remington-Lee was America’s first military bolt-action with a detachable box magazine.

Top 10 Infantry Rifles of All Time

Chosen through staff votes, these top 10 infantry rifles of all time were picked due to innovation, effectiveness, service life, impact on history and small-arms development.

The Ithaca Model 37: A Forgotten 'Trench Gun'

While eclipsed by the far-better-known Winchester Model 97 and Model 12 “trench” and “riot” shotguns, the Ithaca Model 37 served from World War II all the way through Vietnam.

Review: Winchester SX4

Few companies in the American shooting pantheon have a history as storied as Winchester Repeating Arms Co. From its lever-action roots to its more modern innovations, the company has held a key position in the American imagination for decades, a role which it does not appear will be relinquished anytime soon.

The T3 Carbine: First NVG-Equipped Fighting Rifle

Built as a response to Japanese night-infiltration tactics in the Pacific, the T3 carbine fitted with the infrared “Sniperscope, M2” may have looked like a Buck Rogers ray gun, but it saved American lives in the closing days of World War II.

Wartime Winchesters

In its advertisements on the back page of this magazine during World War II, Winchester touted the company as having been “On Guard for America Since 1866.” This was never more true than when it produced arms and ammunition to help defeat Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan.

I Have This Old Gun: Winchester Model 1866 Center-Fire Carbine

In 1857, when Oliver Winchester formed the New Haven Arms Co., he inherited the misfire-prone Volcanic lever-action.

The Keefe Report: “Please Hang in a Prominent Place.”

Those words appear on the back of a circa-1890 Winchester cartridge board on display in the Robert E. Petersen Gallery of NRA’s National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, Va.

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