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Lord Lovat's Rifles: In Film, Recollection and Reality

The most famous rifle of D-Day—or at least the most memorable rifle of “The Longest Day”—wasn’t actually there. Lord Lovat did carry his Mannlicher-Schoenauer carbine in combat, however, and we can learn a lot about British and American guns used during World War II from his memoirs.

D-Day + 75: Arms of the Airborne

Seventy-five years ago, Allied troops invaded Hitler’s “Fortress Europe” to bring an end to Nazi tyranny, and many of them arrived by parachute or glider. They were the men of the British and American airborne, and they were well-armed indeed.

Tonight on American Rifleman TV: Men & Guns of D-Day +75; S&W Bodyguard in .38 Spl.

On June 6, 1944, the greatest armada yet assembled invaded Nazi-occupied France. Our television crew traveled to the actual battlefields, the very places where American, British, Canadian and other Allied troops fought to begin the liberation of Europe.

The Most Famous Rifle Of D-Day … Wasn’t There?

When Lord Lovat led his British Commandos into Normandy on June 6, 1944, he carried his trademark Mannlicher-Shoenauer carbine across Sword Beach, right? Not so fast. Here's what he really carried.

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