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The Krag-Jorgensen: America's First Bolt-Action Service Rifle

The U.S. Krag-Jorgensen was America’s first bolt-action repeater chambered for a smokeless-powder cartridge. In the hands of American troops around the globe, the Krag played a small, but key, role in the rise of the “American Century.”

NRA Gun of the Week: Savage Arms Impulse Hog Hunter

On this week’s “Gun of the Week” video preview, American Rifleman staff check out an American-made straight-pull rifle from Savage Arms.

The Beginnings of Marine Corps Marksmanship

The Marine Corps has long been regarded as some of the best marksmen in the United States Armed Forces, but that was not always the case. Here we look at the history and formation of the Marine Corps marksmanship practices.

The Remington-Lee Rifle: Ahead of Its Time

Today, the detachable box magazine is part of virtually every military rifle, but there was a time when it was just an idea in the fertile mind of inventor James Paris Lee. The Remington-Lee was America’s first military bolt-action with a detachable box magazine.

Early Semi-Automatics: Winchester's First Self-Loading Rifles

Though not well known today, Winchester’s first semi-automatic rifles saw service in and above the trenches of World War I, faced big and dangerous game, and set the stage for the modern sporting rifle.

Rifleman Q&A: Clips, Chargers & Magazines

What is the difference between a clip, a stripper clip and a magazine? These terms seem to often be used to describe the same thing.

This Old Gun: Colt Model 1895 Machine Gun

In this American Rifleman TV episode, we cover the innovative Colt Model 1895 machine gun, also known as the "Potato Digger."

Defining the 'American Rifleman:' Three Traditions of Riflery

Long-held forms of American riflery—precision, classic and defensive—reveal the specialized tools and skills that form the basis of success for anyone seeking to become a better rifleman.

The Model 1895 Lee Navy: Background & Value

Considering the trends in U.S. military firearm technology during the 1890s, the country’s selection of a proprietary straight-pull rifle like the Model 1895 Lee Navy is extraordinary.

Wartime Winchesters

In its advertisements on the back page of this magazine during World War II, Winchester touted the company as having been “On Guard for America Since 1866.” This was never more true than when it produced arms and ammunition to help defeat Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan.

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