FN Awarded

FN Awarded $92 Million Contract for M240s and Receivers

FN America was awarded a contract valued at $92 million to produce more M240 machine guns and spare receivers for the U.S. Army, on top of the other contracts it was awarded last year.

New For 2021: Uberti USA Hardin Revolver

American Rifleman’s Mark Keefe met with Uberti USA’s Tom Leoni to check out the latest Smith & Wesson replica—the Hardin, a 2nd Model No. 3 top-break handgun chambered for .45 Colt.

The International Harvester M1 Garand: A New Rifle for the Nuclear Age

Of the four manufactures contracted by the U.S. Government to produce the M1 rifle, International Harvester was the least obvious of the choices.

The Breechloading Sharps: History & Performance

The Sharps breechloader was a truly innovative design that came right on the eve of America's western expansion. The lever-action design helped to secure the west and excelled on the target ranges as well.

The A.H. Fox Single-Barrel Trap Gun: One of America's Finest

Though not made in large numbers—and eventually killed off by the Great Depression—A.H. Fox Single Barrel Trap guns were some of the finest American trap guns ever built.

'Bad Timing': Rise & Fall of Luxembourg's SOLA Submachine Guns

During the 1950s, Luxembourg found itself involved in an international diplomatic crisis, thanks to the exportation of the SOLA submachine gun family.

Winchester Awarded U.S. Army Ammo Contract

Winchester will act as a second-source provider for U.S. military small-arms ammo under the $37 million contract.

Barrett Awarded U.S. Army Sniper Rifle Contract

The U.S. Army awarded a five-year contract to Barrett for nearly 3,000 of the company's MRAD MK22 MOD 0 rifles.

Rifleman Q&A: A Marine Corps M1917 Rifle?

This "USMC" marked M1917 rifle isn't what it appears to be, but it is a unique part of American military history.

Valuable Service: The U.S. Model of 1917 Revolvers

Swept into World War I in April 1917, the U.S. military desperately needed .45 ACP handguns. Both Colt and Smith & Wesson had existing revolver designs adopted as the Model of 1917, and they would go on to serve again during World War II.

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