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History and Performance Of The The .44-40 WCF

The .44-40 Winchester Center Fire cartridge gained its popularity through its use in the late 19th century in lever-action rifles and revolvers, and is still produced commercially today.

The 1886/93 Lebel: France's Great War Masterpiece

This innovative 8 mm bolt-action repeater, which performed extraordinary service during World War I, was also one of the most important military arms in history.

The Remington-Lee Rifle: Ahead of Its Time

Today, the detachable box magazine is part of virtually every military rifle, but there was a time when it was just an idea in the fertile mind of inventor James Paris Lee. The Remington-Lee was America’s first military bolt-action with a detachable box magazine.

The 45-70 Gov't: History, Performance & Handloading

Here's a look at the history of the storied .45-70 Gov't cartridge that still remains popular today.

Wartime Winchesters

In its advertisements on the back page of this magazine during World War II, Winchester touted the company as having been “On Guard for America Since 1866.” This was never more true than when it produced arms and ammunition to help defeat Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan.

The Luger of the Tropics

In the hands of the military and police—as well as revolutionaries and bandits—for decades, the Luger pistol became a national icon in Brazil.

The Browning X-Bolt Rifle—10 Years Later

Considered “radical” when introduced a decade ago, the Browning X-Bolt has become the company’s flagship.

A Look Back at the Mosin-Nagant 91/30

One of the hardest working rifles in history, the Mosin-Nagant is like a lot of Russian firearms: somewhat crude in design, but very well made—and very dependable.

Product Preview: Lyman 140th Anniversary Sharps Carbine

The No. 1 Tang Sight paved the way for William Lyman and the Lyman Gun Sight Co. in 1878.

Confederate Sharpshooter Berry Benson and His Enfield

The Enfield rifle-musket was preferred by Confederate sharpshooters, including South Carolina Sgt. Berry Benson. In fact, after Gen. Lee surrendered at Appomattox, Benson walked home—and took his rifle with him.

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