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The International Harvester M1 Garand: A New Rifle for the Nuclear Age

Of the four manufactures contracted by the U.S. Government to produce the M1 rifle, International Harvester was the least obvious of the choices.

Rifleman Q&A: Two Serial Numbers On An M1 Carbine?

Some former G.I.-issue M1 carbines have been seen with two serial numbers instead of the traditional one stamped at the rear of the receiver. Why?

Rifleman Q&A: How Do Army 'M' Numbers Work?

M1 Garand, M1911, M14 rifle...where does the military come up with all these numbers and how do they work?

Home Defense Guns: How To Choose The Right One

Possibly the only topic to generate more arguments than politics is the never-ending discussion of what qualifies as the “best” home-defense gun.

The Marlin Model 39: An Unlikely Participant in WWII

Not only was the Marlin Model 39 lever-action .22-cal. rifle a popular rimfire for the commercial market of its day, it even had a small role in the events of one World War II battlefield.

The Guns of Grenada: Operation Urgent Fury

In Oct. 1983, the U.S. military conducted an invasion of the communist-overrun island of Grenada: Operation Urgent Fury. Here we take a look at this history and firearms used by both sides.

NRA Gun of the Week: Citadel RSS1

On this week’s “Gun of the Week,” a Russian-based shotgun design, the Citadel RSS1 provides users with AK-type performance of a piston-driven operating system within a stamped-steel receiver fed by detachable box magazines.

Exploded View: Ruger 10/22 Carbine

When released to the shooting public in 1964, the rimfire Ruger 10/22 retained the sleek outline of the company’s earlier Model 44 center-fire carbine.

Rifleman Q&A: When Did M1 Carbines Get Bayonet Lugs?

I recently purchased an M1 carbine manufactured by Quality Hardware that has a bayonet lug. Is this part original to the gun or was it added later?

Lord Lovat's Rifles: In Film, Recollection and Reality

The most famous rifle of D-Day—or at least the most memorable rifle of “The Longest Day”—wasn’t actually there. Lord Lovat did carry his Mannlicher-Schoenauer carbine in combat, however, and we can learn a lot about British and American guns used during World War II from his memoirs.

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