Horman Taurus TX22 1

Taurus TX22 Competition: An Optic-Ready Rimfire

Following the current growing trend of optic-ready handguns, Taurus has adapted several of its handguns to accept micro red-dot sights, including the new rimfire TX22 Competition chambered in .22 LR.  

Rifleman Q&A: Number Of Turns To Focus A Scope?

From the archives of American Rifleman, read about ocular-ring adjustments on riflescopes from the July 2004 magazine.

Rifleman’s Lexicon: Formulas For Success

What do statisticians and firearm enthusiasts have in common? Math. Check out these 10 widely used firearm formulas by today's riflemen.

The .17 Winchester Super Magnum Cartridge

Spurred by the creation of the .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire, Winchester introduced it own .17-cal. rimfire magnum cartridge in the form of the .17 Winchester Super Magnum, or .17 WSM.

The 27 Nosler: The New .270 Cartridge King?

Thanks to greater powder capacity and long, heavy-for-caliber bullets, the new .277-cal. cartridge from Nosler offers impressive accuracy and downrange performance. But can it dethrone the venerable .270 Win.?

Good Ammo & Good Reloads: Starting With Once-Fired Brass

Factory ammunition is better than it has ever been, but it still doesn't beat handloads. See what this Barrett MRAD in .300 Norma Mag. is capable of with custom-crafted handloads made from once-fired brass.

Rifleman Q&A: An Auger Gun In The Civil War?

From the archives of American Rifleman, read about Wilson Ager's "Coffee Mill Gun" from the June 2004 magazine.

DIY Custom Heritage Mfg. Rough Rider Revolvers

The Heritage Manufacturing Inc. Rough Rider rimfire line of revolvers can be customized and changed without a gunsmith, allowing owners to do their own alterations to it with parts from Heritage.

The Remington Model 11 Sportsman In World War II

Just like millions of American sportsmen, Remington’s “The Sportsman” pulled its weight as a trainer and guard gun during World War II.

Thinking In Three Dimensions: The Genius of John Moses Browning

His firearms have figured significantly in history for more than a century, but John Moses Browning had a method of inventing that is only now being fully understood—and may come as quite a surprise.

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