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The CVA Hunter: A Top-Selling Single-Shot Rifle

Connecticut Valley Arms' Hunter is a single-shot rifle designed for workhorse duty in the field, and that makes it popular with today's buyers.

Ruger No. 1: A Top-Selling Single-Shot Rifle

Ruger's No. 1 design continues to be popular among single-shot rifle fans, and it's not hard to see why.

Rossi Matched Pair: The Top-Selling Single-Shot of 2020

Though it's a single-shot design, the Rossi Matched Pair comes with two barrels, and it's one of the best-selling rifles sold on GunBroker.

NRA Gun of the Week: Uberti USA 1885 Courteney Stalking Rifle

On this week’s “Gun of the Week,” American Rifleman staff discuss the features of a single-shot rifle modeled after the famed 1885 High Wall and chambered for .303 British.

CVA Hunter: A Top-Selling Single-Shot Rifle

Although it was replaced by the CVA Scout, the CVA Hunter is one of the most popular single-shot rifles on the market.

The .458 Lott: A Dedicated Cartridge for Dangerous Game

The .458 Lott, legitimized as a factory proposition by Ruger and Hornady, is a task-specific cartridge made for the business of taking on the world’s biggest—and most dangerous—game.

Uberti 1885 High Wall: A Top-Selling Single Shot

According to sales figures on GunBroker's Gun Genius rankings, one of the most popular single shots you can buy today is the Uberti 1885 High Wall.

Favorite Firearms: A Remington Nylon 76 From Santa

It was Christmas of 1962 when Santa Claus (my dad) surprised me with a new .22 rifle. I had spent the past year and half in the Boy Scouts, and one of my scoutmaster’s favorite pastimes was hunting jackrabbits.

The 5.7x28mm: History & Design

While the 5.7x28mm cartridge has seen a resurgence in 2020, there have been attempts to make it into the mainstream before.

This Old Gun: French Tabatière Rifled Musket

One of the interesting things about the military—especially in centuries past—is that under certain circumstances it will doggedly refurbish or reconfigure war materiel—sometimes to the point of absurdity.

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