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Branching Out: Trijicon's Expansive Riflescope Lineup

Best known for advanced optics such as the ACOG, VCOG and RMR, Trijicon has waded into standard riflescopes in a big way with six new lines of variable-power riflescopes in traditional formats.

World War II German Sniper Systems: Rifles, Optics & Ammo

Throughout World War II the Germans used and developed several variations of sniper optics and rifles that evolved throughout the course of the war.

Inside Trijicon: The Legacy of the ACOG

American Rifleman TV is in Wixom, Mi., at the home of Trijicon Inc., detailing the Advanced Combat Optical Gunsight.

Trijicon 1-8X VCOG Selected as USMC Squad Common Optic

Trijicon announced that its VCOG 1-8x28 mm has been selected by the U.S. Marine Corps for use as its Squad Common Optic.

Reaching Out With Trijicon’s Accupower

The American gunsight company best known for its revolutionary both-eyes-open aiming concept, military-contract battle optics and industry-changing tritium night sights is now all-in on the high-magnification, long-range riflescope market.

Back to Basics: Modern Rifle Optics

Today’s riflescope is tougher, more precise with its elevation and windage adjustments, and has much clearer optics.

First Look: Trijicon SRO (Specialized Reflex Optic)

The biggest difference between the RMR and the SRO is also the SRO’s largest physical feature—the viewing lens.

Product Preview: Trijicon Fiber Sights

Trijicon has a lot of experience both in manufacturing robust pistol iron sights, and in the use of fiber optics in firearm aiming devices—including in its famed ACOG rifle optics.

VLTOR A5: The Cure for the Common Fixed Stock

As the ability to swap out parts quickly and easily has endeared the AR-15 to the civilian world, the flexibility of the M16 platform has led to its adoption around the world.

The Case for the 20"-Barreled AR-15 Rifle

Although the semi-automatic M4-style carbine has dominated the AR market for many years, there is growing interest in ARs more akin to the original design. Why? The rifle-length AR may be your best bet when it comes to ballistics, reliability and durability.

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