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The Remington Model 11 Sportsman In World War II

Just like millions of American sportsmen, Remington’s “The Sportsman” pulled its weight as a trainer and guard gun during World War II.

New For 2021: Uberti USA Hardin Revolver

American Rifleman’s Mark Keefe met with Uberti USA’s Tom Leoni to check out the latest Smith & Wesson replica—the Hardin, a 2nd Model No. 3 top-break handgun chambered for .45 Colt.

The International Harvester M1 Garand: A New Rifle for the Nuclear Age

Of the four manufactures contracted by the U.S. Government to produce the M1 rifle, International Harvester was the least obvious of the choices.

Rifleman Q&A: Why The En Bloc Clip?

Why did John Garand include an en-bloc clip in his M1 rifle design? One reader writes in, and we set the record straight.

'From The Ordnance Department': The NRA Model of 1911

Life members of the National Rifle Association and individual members of its affiliated rifle clubs may purchase from the Ordnance Department the new Army Model .45 Colt Automatic Pistol.

Rifleman Q&A: Two Serial Numbers On An M1 Carbine?

Some former G.I.-issue M1 carbines have been seen with two serial numbers instead of the traditional one stamped at the rear of the receiver. Why?

'Give Me A Gunny': Marine Gunnery Sergeants in the Firearm Industry

Marine Gunnery Sergeants are not only invaluable for their service in uniform, they also play an important role in the firearms industry with their expertise.

Valuable Service: The U.S. Model of 1917 Revolvers

Swept into World War I in April 1917, the U.S. military desperately needed .45 ACP handguns. Both Colt and Smith & Wesson had existing revolver designs adopted as the Model of 1917, and they would go on to serve again during World War II.

Rifleman Q&A: What Does My Garand Stock Stamp Mean?

Q: I have an M1 Garand rifle that has “SA/EMcF” on the left side of the stock. Is the marking from the inspection process, and is it possible to know who approved my rifle?

The 'Trench Gun' in World War I

During World War I American “Doughboys” went “over the top” with a fearsome, distinctly American arm—the trench shotgun.

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