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Artistry From the Red Barn: Ruger's Engraved Guns

In the world of Ruger collectors, these rare factory-engraved guns are some of the most collectible of all, and they tell a fascinating story of the early years at Sturm, Ruger & Co.

The Keefe Report: The Ubiquitous Ruger 10/22

With about 8 million made, there's no other semi-automatic rimfire carbine that even comes close to the Ruger 10/22. Ubiquitous is certainly the right word for it.

The 10mm Auto: History & Performance of a Potent Pistol Cartridge

Nearly four decades after it made its debut, the 10mm Auto is offered in more loads and guns than ever before, including four different M1911-based pistols.

D-Day's Forgotten Guns: 12 Firearms Used in June 1944

We all know about the M1 Garand and the Thompson submachine gun, but troops in Normandy used much more. See these 12 forgotten guns of the D-Day landings.

The M1 Carbine: 10 Little-Known Facts

The “U.S. Carbine, Caliber .30, M1” was the most produced American infantry arm of World War II. And it's back.

Thompson Auto-Ordnance Iwo Jima Series

To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the battle of Iwo Jima and the American servicemen who achieved victory, Thompson Auto-Ordnance of the Kahr Firearms Group has developed a series of three specially engraved firearms: the Iwo Jima 1911 in .45 ACP ($1,247), Iwo Jima M1 Carbine in .30 Carbine ($1,391) and Iwo Jima Thompson also in .45 ACP ($1,886).

The Swedish K in Vietnam and Beyond

Developed after World War II, the m/45B or “Swedish K” submachine gun was used by Swedish troops in hotspots such as the Congo, but more significantly by U.S. Special Forces in the jungles of Vietnam.

Auto-Ordnance D-Day Commemoratives

Auto-Ordnance is commemorating the 75th anniversary of D-Day with three specially engraved and ornamented guns—an M1911, an M1 carbine and a Thompson.

A Look Back at the Thompson Submachine Gun

There is only a limited supply of Thompsons left, and fewer yet that can be fired. Learn the history of this iconic submachine gun.

The G.I. Thompson In World War II

Although the U.S. Army was slow to adopt the iconic gun, the Marines had been using them since the 1920s, and the Thompson became an important tool in defending freedom.

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