Heckler & Koch XM8 Rifle black plastic futuristic weapon gun Army soldier

The Heckler & Koch XM8: A Look Back

The XM8 system grew out of the U.S. Army’s XM29 program in search of a successor to the in-service M4, and here is a behind-the-scenes look at Heckler & Koch's configurable system.

The Rifle: Combat Stories From America's Last WWII Veterans

When 28-year-old Marine Andrew Biggio bought an M1 Garand, he never imagined the journey that would ensue.

Rifleman Q&A: Custom M1903 Carbine?

From the archives of American Rifleman, after spotting an unusual gun in a World War II-era photograph one NRA member writes the editors with questions about the U.S. military's use of cut-down M1903 Springfield rifles.

Pearl Harbor Survivors: M1903 Rifles Salvaged From U.S.S. California

When the battleship U.S.S. California was sunk during the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, several M1903 rifles still in her hull were salvaged after the attack, as revealed thanks to the efforts of the Archival Research Group.

Rifleman Q&A: Roos Underhammer Muzzleloader

From the archives of American Rifleman, read about a German-made, upside-down built, small-bore muzzleloader.

Weatherby Mark V: History & Disassembly

The Weatherby Mark V represented a new direction for the company in 1954. While earlier Weatherbys had been built on outsourced actions, Weatherby now had its own proprietary design.

Smith & Wesson's Triple Lock: A Look Back

The Triple Lock was the first Smith & Wesson revolver built on what is now called the N-frame—S&W’s N-frames have defined the modern wheelgun.

M1903A4 Development: The U.S. Army’s Search for a Sniper Rifle

Despite the lessons learned during World War I, the U.S. Army lacked a purpose-built sniper rifle throughout the interwar period, even after efforts were made to develop one. The need became more apparent as World War II loomed, leading to the adoption of the M1903A4, with its developmental history explored here.

The NRA In WWII: 'Good For A Free America'

This year marks the 150th celebration of your National Rifle Association. In celebration, and to learn more about your NRA, take a look back at the cover of the October 1943 American Rifleman featuring Pulitzer Prize-winning staff artist Jim Berryman and a 1945 letter from the White House.

Unexpected Longevity: Foreign Use Of The M1 Garand

More than eight decades after its invention, the M1 Garand rifle continues to see use today fir both ceremonial and combat by foreign nations and militant groups across the globe.

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