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Communist Small Arms of the Korean War

Throughout the Korean War, Communist North Korean and Chinese forces used a variety of small arms from different sources to arm their soldiers. Here we explore some of these Communist-used firearms.

1918 Mauser Tankgewehr: Restoring a World War I Tank Killer

Faced with waves of advancing Allied tanks, the Germans developed the massive 13.2 mm Tankgewehr. This one survived the war, but not a fire. Here’s the story of how a restorer put it back together for future generations.

Exploded View: SKS Carbine

The SKS is somewhat unusual in that, despite being widely encountered in the United States today, it had a relatively short and uneventful service life in Russia where it originated.

First Action in the European Theater: The M1 Garand at Dieppe

While used previously in defense of the Philippines, the American M1 would not see European-theater combat until August of 1942, during a botched raid on Dieppe.

The M1 Garand At Dieppe

In August 1942, a small force of U.S. Army Rangers accompanying British and Canadian troops attacked the Germans in occupied France at Dieppe. It was the first combat use of the Garand in the European Theater of Operations.

“Where Will We Bury Them All?” Finnish Arms Of The Winter War

Invaded by the expansionist Soviet Union in 1939, the Finns, a small nation of practiced riflemen, held Stalin’s hordes at bay for months with Mosin-Nagants and other small arms, including those designed by Aimo Lahti.

The Contender: Winchester’s .224 Light Rifle

Rendered in blued steel and walnut, Winchester’s .224-cal. Light Weight Military Rifle could well have become the U.S. Army’s standard arm. But the company gave up on the project in the face of competition from Armalite and its futuristic AR-15.

Foreign Weapons 101

Learning about the guns our troops are encountering in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The .50-cal. Browning Machine Gun—The Gun That Won The War

With its origins in the Great War, the .50-cal. Browning machine gun—on land, on the sea and in the air—was a decisive arm for America’s victory over Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. And, remarkably, it’s still in service today.

Sniping In Korea: 1950-1953

When U.S. forces rushed to stop the North Koreans from overrunning South Korea in 1950, there were almost no American snipers. As the battle lines stabilized, that would change, and the war would become ideal for the employment of well-equipped and well-trained snipers.

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