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H&R 1871 Buffalo Classic Rifle

For many decades, hunters across the country—indeed, around the world—have used the economical and simple break-action rifles from Harrington & Richardson (now H&R 1871 and New England Firearms) to harvest everything from squirrels to deer, black bear, elk and moose. As a general rule, the overriding appeal of these arms was their robust, uncomplicated utility.

Kel-Tec PLR-16 Pistol

It’s not an AR, but it can take AR magazines. What is this…this thing?

Loading the .300 Winchester Magnum

An all-around cartridge for North American Big Game.

Redfield's Return

Made Right, Made Here.

Target Shooting Grows in Popularity

Approximately 34 million Americans participated in the shooting sports.

80 Years of Weaver Scopes

Even after 80 years, Weaver scopes represent quality and value.

Defensive Pistols: Low Recoil Options

Recoil sensitive shooters, or those who suffer from hand problems, must consider caliber, weight, size and capacity when choosing defensive handguns.

6.5 Creedmoor: Rifle and Load

Conceived of at Camp Perry, the 6.5 Creedmoor crosses the competition and hunting boundaries.

Colt Bisley Revolver

The Bisley was a target version of the Single Action Army that was overshadowed by its more romanticized older brother.

MC-3: The First Upside Down Gun

Even after being banned from international competition in 1956, production of the revolutionary MC-3 continued in Russia.

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