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Angus McClellan’s Top 10 Handguns

Editors’ picks for the handguns that changed the world.

The Beretta M9: 25 Years of Service

The Beretta family, company, and Italian industry can take justifiable pride in doing what to many seemed the impossible: a foreign-based company winning the contract for the U.S. Armed Forces sidearm, a historic first of major significance.

The Citadel M1-22

This sub-caliber replica of the iconic M1 provides historic fun.

That "Damned, Jammed Chauchat"

Issued to American Doughboys and Marines during World War I, the Chauchat automatic rifle was plagued with problems.

Top 10 Infantry Rifles

The Top 10 Infantry Rifles were chosen due to innovation, effectiveness, service life, impact on history and small-arms development.

I Have This Old Gun: Model 1895 Lee Navy

Considering the trends in U.S. military firearm technology during the 1890s, the country’s selection of a proprietary straight-pull rifle is extraordinary.

Top 10 Infantry Rifles

The Top 10 Infantry Rifles were chosen due to innovation, effectiveness, service life, impact on history and small-arms development.

The Contender: Winchester’s .224 Light Rifle

Rendered in blued steel and walnut, Winchester’s .224-cal. Light Weight Military Rifle could well have become the U.S. Army’s standard arm. But the company gave up on the project in the face of competition from Armalite and its futuristic AR-15.

Post-World War II M1 Garand Rifles

Put back into production after the outbreak of the Korean War, M1 rifles made by Springfield, International Harvester and Harrington & Richardson in the 1950s were the last of the Garands. Today, they are gaining attention from collectors and shooters alike.

The M1A1 Carbine

The “U.S. Carbine, Caliber .30, M1A1”—used by the elite American Airborne throughout World War II and beyond—is one of the classic American arms of the Second World War and, for the modern collector, a true prize.

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