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Garand Vs. Pedersen

The M1 Garand’s adoption was far from a sure thing.

Chad Adams' Top 10 Infantry Rifles

Editors' picks for the rifles that changed the world.

The Men & Guns of the “Battle of the Bulge”

The Bulge was a rifleman’s battle.

The First Garands

The U.S. Army adopted the U.S. Rifle Semiautomatic Caliber .30, M1, in 1936. It is better known as the Garand.

The National Match M1

The M1 was potentially as accurate as any service rifle ever made.

Top 10 Infantry Rifles

The Top 10 Infantry Rifles were chosen due to innovation, effectiveness, service life, impact on history and small-arms development.

7.62x51 mm NATO U.S. Navy Garand Rifles

With the U.S. Army and Marine Corps receiving the bulk of early M14 rifle production, the Navy chose to convert .30-’06 Sprg. M1 Garands to 7.62x51 mm NATO, extending the service life of John Garand’s masterpiece.

Testing The Army’s M855A1 Standard Ball Cartridge

Spanning a decade-and-a-half, the process of adopting the lead-free 5.56x45 mm NATO M855A1 ball cartridge was hardly transparent. In the end, however, testing indicates that our troops ended up with a better combat round.

The M1C Garand Sniper Rifle

When the U.S. Army sought a sniping rifle based on the M1 Garand at the end of World War II, the M1C, with its offset scope, was delivered in small numbers. Never the best solution, the M1C performed adequately in post-war service and remains one of the most highly prized American military rifles.

U.S. Nomenclature

An American Rifleman reader inquires about the nomenclature for the bolt-action Springfield rifle.

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