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Foreign Weapons 101

Learning about the guns our troops are encountering in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Rifleman’s Canfield Is a “Star,” A Cajun One

American Rifleman Field Editor Bruce N. Canfield is one of the nation’s leading authorities and authors on American military arms.

“Where Will We Bury Them All?” Finnish Arms Of The Winter War

Invaded by the expansionist Soviet Union in 1939, the Finns, a small nation of practiced riflemen, held Stalin’s hordes at bay for months with Mosin-Nagants and other small arms, including those designed by Aimo Lahti.

The Contender: Winchester’s .224 Light Rifle

Rendered in blued steel and walnut, Winchester’s .224-cal. Light Weight Military Rifle could well have become the U.S. Army’s standard arm. But the company gave up on the project in the face of competition from Armalite and its futuristic AR-15.

NRA Annual Meetings Seminar Preview: “Guns Of Pearl Harbor” and “Sniping In Vietnam”

At the 145th NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits in Louisville, Ky., American Rifleman will host four special presentations, including one in honor of the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor—”a day which will live in infamy”—Dec. 7, 1941.

Exploded View: SKS Carbine

The SKS is somewhat unusual in that, despite being widely encountered in the United States today, it had a relatively short and uneventful service life in Russia where it originated.

SKS Modifications: Nods To Practicality

Although Sergei Simonov’s SKS had a relatively short service history, the tough, stripper-clip-fed infantry arm is deserving of consideration by anyone seeking a reliable semi-automatic rifle chambered in the 7.62x39 mm cartridge.

The .50-cal. Browning Machine Gun—The Gun That Won The War

With its origins in the Great War, the .50-cal. Browning machine gun—on land, on the sea and in the air—was a decisive arm for America’s victory over Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. And, remarkably, it’s still in service today.

The First Panzerjäger: Germany’s T-Gewehr Anti-Tank Rifle

In response to the new Allied armored threat, Waffenfabrik Mauser AG quickly designed and produced a special rifle to fight tanks: the 13.2 mm Tank Abwehr Gewehr M1918, or “T-Gewehr.”

Shades of “Thunderbolt & Lightfoot”: The 20 mm Brinks Heist.

Truth is often stranger than fiction. In this case, some strange truth was adapted into fiction and ultimately became part of the plot of a pretty good action movie.

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