Ruger Mini-14 Carbine Exploded View

by
posted on May 22, 2009
2009522113956-rugermini14_ms.jpg

The .223 (5.56 mm) Mini-14 resembles the U.S. M14 rifle in appearance and incorporates the Garand rotating bolt principle.

The Ruger-designed gun was first produced in 1974 in Southport, Conn., where about 1000 were made before production was transfered to the larger Sturn, Ruger plant in Newport, N.H. All Southport guns and early runs of those made at Newport bear serial numbers with the 180-prefix. The Southport model can be identified by the sporting type, gold bead front sight.

In mid-1978, a refined Mini-14 replaced the "180-" prefix models. Current production Mini-14 carbines bear the serial number prefix "181-". The drawings and information which follow apply only to the "181-" Mini-14 series.

Although several specialized variations of the Mini-14 designed for use by law enforcement and government agencies will be encountered from time to time, these are virtually identical to the standard production guns with respect to disassembly procedures. Government service Mini-14 carbines are usually equipped with a flash hider and with a special front sight with protective steel "ears" on either side of the sight blade. Some service models use a heat resistant ventilated upper handguard which replaces the standard wooden handguard...

Latest

AXE
AXE

Preview: LA Police Gear Freedom Axe

With full-tang construction, a 3Cr13 stainless-steel head and water-resistant Pakkawood scales, the compact Freedom Axe from LA Police Gear is a versatile survival tool designed to shrug off the elements and hard use.

Rifleman Q&A: .32 Long Rimfire Shot?

Where did .32 Long Rimfire shotshell cartridges come from? What guns were chambered for it? Here's what we found out.

The .32-20 Winchester Center Fire: History & Performance

Born from a desire for a faster and flatter shooting cartridge, the .32-20 Winchester Center Fire cartridge came to the world stage at the end of the 19th century as a popular option for revolvers and lever-action rifles alike, but its popularity eventually dwindled as the 20th century progressed.

Tavor X95: The Updated Israeli Bullpup

Unveiled in 2016 and claiming a prestigious NRA Publication’s Golden Bullseye award by the next year, the Tavor X95 was a commerical success and improved upon the design of the original Tavor SAR. 

NRA Gun of the Week: Kimber 84M Pro Varmint

On this week’s “Gun of the Week” video preview, watch as American Rifleman staff take a short-action Kimber 84M rifle to the range for discussion.

The Armed Citizen® Oct. 15, 2021

Read today's "The Armed Citizen" entry for real stories of law-abiding citizens, past and present, who used their firearms to save lives.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.