Fear & Loading: Official State Gun Suggestions

by
posted on March 1, 2016
spud_gun.jpg

Now that Tennessee has named the Barrett Model 82/M107 its official state rifle, other states should be taking their shot. Although some anti-gun politicians may be reluctant, there’s still a way to avoid angst by going with an option that reflects the region, its history or even traditions. With that in mind, I humbly offer a few suggestions.

Idaho—Potato gun: It’s a gun-friendly state, but who doesn’t love ballistic spuds? It’s the snack food of all projectiles. (Spud gun image courtesy Zephyris at the English language Wikipedia).

New Mexico—Soldering gun, because it’s also a dry heat.

Washington—Squirt gun, at least until Seattle taxes kids out of poolside ammo, too.  

New Jersey—Smart gun, because state legislators claim to be more intelligent than their constituents and never work.

California—Shogun, watch reruns on Netflix, please, we need the cash.  

Massachusetts—Glue gun, because we don’t like firearms and we’re sticking to it.

Washington, D.C.—Flare gun, bright flash, little effect.

Illinois—Nail gun, keeping the lids closed on dead conservative voters since 2008.

OK, American Rifleman has already covered the states with official guns, but I have to add the reasons I think they really were selected.

Tennesee—Barrett Model 82/M107—Giving powerful reach to American troops since 1990.

Alaska—Pre-1964 Winchester Model 70, where controlled feeding of bears is recommended in single-round servings.  

Arizona—Colt Single Action revolver, which is square-dance-approved and won the West.

West Virginia—Hall rifle, the first American breech loader and sort of a half-breed muzzleloader, because there’s no reason to go all in with this newfangled center-fire cartridge fad.

Pennsylvania—Longrifle, also known at the Kentucky rifle or Pennsylvania rifle, which launched the Red Coat tradition of screaming “run away” in 1776 that would later be popularized in Monte Python’s movie “Holy Grail.”

Indiana—Grouseland rifle, because it sounds like a place where bird hunters flock.  

Utah—1911 handgun, because John Moses Browning lived in Ogden and, more importantly, the state called “dibs.”

 

Latest

Springfield Armory Emissary 1911 New 2021 F
Springfield Armory Emissary 1911 New 2021 F

New for 2021: Springfield Armory Emissary 1911

Springfield Armory's new Emissary 1911 combines the features of today's cutting-edge defensive 1911 with some of the best custom features you can find in the handgun market.

ARTV: The Kel-Tec Story

Watch this segment of American Rifleman Television, originally aired in 2019, to learn about the history, manufacturing principles and firearm designs offered by Kel-Tec Firearms, located in Cocoa, Fla.

Review: Leupold DeltaPoint Micro

Leupold’s DeltaPoint Micro doesn’t look like any other slide-mounted optic. Rather than using a flat-bottomed design, the DP Micro features an L-shaped mounting surface that covers the top-rear portion of its host’s slide, with a small 9 mm lens sitting atop the gun and the battery compartment overhanging the aft of the slide.

Streamlight Donations Support for Breast Cancer Research

For the past 13 years, Streamlight has donated proceeds from sales of the pink lights to support the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Preview: NoSweat Baseball Hat Liners

NoSweat disposable hat liners instantly absorb sweat and wick it away from the user’s skin, reducing odor, stains and obstructed vision.

ARTV Preview: New Colt Wheel Guns, Kel-Tec P17 and The Gewehr 33/40

This week on American Rifleman Television, we go behind-the-scenes to see how Colt makes its revolvers, test the Kel-Tec P17 pistol and examine the history of the German Gewehr 33/40 rifle.

Interests



Subscribe to the NRA American Rifleman newsletter