Excuses

by
posted on January 29, 2014
gsagi2015_fs.jpg

Smith & Wesson and Ruger are going to scale down/suspend efforts to keep their handguns on California’s approved list. You can read all about it at the Washington Times. But, the story made me curious as to which pistols are on California’s bad boy list and why. Here’s the current roster, and some explanations for their inclusion, as I see it.

In a state where most of the Hollywood elite can’t count past five without holding up their other hand, a serious safety problem arises during reloads of an eight-round “magazine” (I’d say cylinder, but I’m trying to honor California’s legal terminology). Hence, on Jan. 14, a Smith & Wesson 5-inch barreled .22 Long Rifle revolver joined the list.

Five target-shooting handguns chambered in rimfire were also banned on New Year’s Eve. This model’s seven-inch barrel defies the state’s obligatory no-more-than-five-digits-number rule. And you have to be a card-carrying member of the plastic surgeon’s union to offer two-tone finishes in the state.

On Nov. 12, the Smith & Wesson 500 Hunter (7.5-inch barrel) even found its way onto the list. I own a version (also on that list) that sparkles brighter than a smile after a dental cleaning-not exactly concealable, and carryable only when wearing a feathered pink fedora with matching cowboy boots. However, it’s bad form if any object in the state outshines a professional-athlete’s blingware, provided by overpriced tickets, ridiculous endorsement deals and $10 concession hot dogs.

The handguns on California’s non-compliance list continues to grow. A variety of Ruger Mark IIIs are included, each chambered in .22 Long Rifle. They’re ideal for plinking and target shooting, and if they effectively ban those lawful pursuits….well, qualified opinion on malicious attempts to suspend the Second Amendment are available the NRA-ILA website. The fine folks there know what they’re doing and, as you can see, I’m only qualified for giving political advice to liberal bureaucrats.

Latest

Qamain
Qamain

Rifleman Q&A: Bullet & Primer Sealant

From the archives of American Rifleman, one NRA member questions the importance of the colorful or black-colored paint-like coating around the cartridge necks and primer pockets of surplus ammunition.

Preview: Zero Tolerance Knives 0357BW

The U.S.-made Zero Tolerance 0357 Black Wash liner lock features a 3.25" blade of hard, wear-resistant CPM 20CV steel treated with a scratch-hiding blackwash finish best suited for everyday carry.

The French FR F2 Sniper Rifle

Conceived during the Cold War and after thirty years of service, the French are beginning to phase out the FR F2 bolt-action sniper rifle, with the surplus rifles available for sale from Navy Arms.

SIG Sauer P210: The Long-Lived Swiss Service Pistol

First designed in 1947, and formerly the official sidearm of the Swiss Army, the SIG Sauer P210 is still in production today, with a few modern upgrades.

The Winchester Model 94: History & Disassembly

Compact, reliable and powerful, Winchester's Model 1894 lever-actions may not have the popularity it once had with Western settlers, prospectors, law enforcement officers, hunters and ranchers, but its legacy remains today and is a fan favorite in Winchester's current product line.

NRA Gun of the Week: Fabarm USA Autumn

On this week’s “Gun of the Week” video preview, American Rifleman examines a first from Fabarm, a side-by-side break-action shotgun called the Autumn.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.