Rifles > Historical

Firearm Ideas That Failed

For every firearm design that flourished and went on to fame and fortune, several others arrived with great fanfare only to fizzle out at a very young age. Here are a few examples of underachievers.

April 21, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Short Stories About Long Shots

In this week's article taken from the July 1944 issue, War Correspondent Bill Shadel shares stories gleaned in Italy by GI correspondents.

April 17, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Cassino Close-Up

In this week's article taken from the May 1944 issue, War Correspondent Bill Shadel shares an eye-witness account of the bitter stalemate at Cassino.

April 10, 2014

A Look Back at the Remington 700

Arguably the most popular bolt-action rifle ever made, the Model 700 traces its lineage back to the 1917 Enfield.

April 09, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Snipers in Sicily

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the American Rifleman archives. In this week's article taken from the April 1944 issue, War Correspondent Bill Shadel shares stories of the successful drive across the heart of Sicily.

April 03, 2014

Throwback Thursday: An Old-Time Sniper

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the American Rifleman archives. In this week's article taken from the January 1926 issue, W.H. Richard shares an incredible feat of marksmanship during the War of 1812.

March 27, 2014

A Veteran of D-Day: "Mac" Evans, American Rifleman

On June 6, 1944, Clarence G. “Mac” Evans was an 18-year-old rifleman in G Company, 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division. He stepped off the ramp of his Higgins boat into the cold water of the Atlantic before hitting the beach at the Easy Green sector of Omaha Beach. Now at age 87, “Mac,” who has been featured on “American Rifleman Television,” still makes it out to the range once in a while.

March 26, 2014

Guns of the Battle of Blair Mountain

In 1921, “Marching Miners” squared off against mine owners and the “Logan County Defenders” in the mountains of West Virginia in one of the biggest labor disputes—and battles—to occur on United States soil, and one in which Thompson submachine guns loomed large.

March 13, 2014

Cabela's Pedersoli Blue Ridge Rifle

For the shooter who wants to experience firearms of the past, but doesn’t have the capital necessary to purchase a longrifle from one of the semi-custom makers, the Blue Ridge is good option. Read the full review from American Rifleman.

March 06, 2014

Sporterizing the Mosin-Nagant M44

Can an old surplus military rifle be transformed into a useful sporting gun with good ammo and aftermarket parts?

February 21, 2014

A Look Back at the Winchester 1894

With more than 7 million produced, the Winchester ’94 is the most popular sporting rifle ever made.

February 11, 2014

I Have This Old Gun: U.S. Model 1841 “Mississippi” Rifle

America’s soldiers are fond of giving their favorite firearms nicknames—“Kentucky,” “Ol’ Slabsides,” “Horizontal Shot Tower”—but few are as evocative as the U.S. Model 1841 “Mississippi” rifle.

December 27, 2013

7.62x51 mm NATO U.S. Navy Garand Rifles

With the U.S. Army and Marine Corps receiving the bulk of early M14 rifle production, the Navy chose to convert .30-’06 Sprg. M1 Garands to 7.62x51 mm NATO, extending the service life of John Garand’s masterpiece.

December 23, 2013

Unmistakable: The Thompson

The iconic Thompson Submachine Gun was the main Allied submachine gun in the critical early years of World War II. From Bataan to the Kasserine Pass, and from Normandy to Okinawa, the “Tommy Gun” served American troops well.

December 11, 2013

NRA National Sporting Arms Museum Opens Serial Number One Guns Exhibit

The NRA National Sporting Arms Museum at the Bass Pro Shops flagship superstore is featuring the first ever Serial Number One Guns exhibit.

October 17, 2013