Rifles > Historical

Throwback Thursday: Lessons of the War

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the archives. From the August 20, 1914 edition of Arms & The Man, the editors caution on siding too strongly with any of the combatants, but rather with the one whose cause is most just. (Armor Plate Press image)

July 17, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Domestic Struggle

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the archives. From the August 6, 1914 edition of Arms & The Man, the editors mull the outbreak of World War I and the imminent United States' involvement. (Armor Plate Press image)

July 10, 2014

Throwback Thursday: What of the War?

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the archives. From the August 1914 edition of Arms & The Man on the outbreak of World War I, our editors predicted total war and the need for Americans to be trained rifleman. (National Archives image)

June 19, 2014

The Forgotten Guns of D-Day

When it comes to the infantry arms of D-Day and the Battle for Normandy, guns such as the M1 Garand and Thompson come as no surprise, but what about whole American regiments armed with other guns—well-known or forgotten—of the “Great Crusade"?

June 06, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Letter From D-Day

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the American Rifleman archives. This letter appeared in the August 1944 issue, which featured NRA Life Member Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower on the cover.

June 05, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Samuel E. Tobias, Xenia Gunsmith

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the American Rifleman archives. In this week's article taken from the March 1926 issue, W.W. McGowan introduces gun nut and gunsmithing expert Samuel E. Tobias.

May 22, 2014

Throwback Thursday: The Evolution of a Guncrank's Wife

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the American Rifleman archives. In this week's article taken from the January 1932 issue, Margaret Eimer humorously shares the woes of being married to a gun nut.

May 15, 2014

The Guns of 1864

In 1864, more and more repeating rifles—Spencers and “sixteen shooter” Henrys—made their way into Union units. The South was being overwhelmed by superior numbers and firepower. If 1863 was the year of the rifle-musket in America’s bloody Civil War, then 1864 was the year of the repeater.

May 05, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Indoor Novelty Shoots

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the American Rifleman archives. In this week's article taken from the January 1926 issue, George L. Cutting reports on the activities of his shooting club.

May 01, 2014

Firearm Ideas That Failed

For every firearm design that flourished and went on to fame and fortune, several others arrived with great fanfare only to fizzle out at a very young age. Here are a few examples of underachievers.

April 21, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Short Stories About Long Shots

In this week's article taken from the July 1944 issue, War Correspondent Bill Shadel shares stories gleaned in Italy by GI correspondents.

April 17, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Cassino Close-Up

In this week's article taken from the May 1944 issue, War Correspondent Bill Shadel shares an eye-witness account of the bitter stalemate at Cassino.

April 10, 2014

A Look Back at the Remington 700

Arguably the most popular bolt-action rifle ever made, the Model 700 traces its lineage back to the 1917 Enfield.

April 09, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Snipers in Sicily

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the American Rifleman archives. In this week's article taken from the April 1944 issue, War Correspondent Bill Shadel shares stories of the successful drive across the heart of Sicily.

April 03, 2014

Throwback Thursday: An Old-Time Sniper

Every Thursday we'll share an article from the American Rifleman archives. In this week's article taken from the January 1926 issue, W.H. Richard shares an incredible feat of marksmanship during the War of 1812.

March 27, 2014