Sighted Fire

The best way to ensure that you will hit what you’re aiming at is to use the sights that are included on every handgun built. It’s amazing how manufacturers are able to put those little indents and raised platforms on a gun in such a way that you would think they had been doing this for centuries and might have an idea of how to build guns. Oh, wait, they have and they do.

Sights are designed to be used, and regardless of how many times Hollywood shows the hero flinging a shot from the hip and hitting the bad guy from way out, it doesn’t work in most situations. It is best to learn to use the sights and allow muscle memory to take over in a dangerous situation. The more you practice, the faster and smoother the sights will come up to eye level, allowing you to hit your target.

You should start with a basic slow-fire string, and slowly speed up the rate of fire, keeping the shots in about a 10-inch circle on the target. From there, go to the low-ready position and quickly raise the gun to take a single shot. Then, increase the round count by one until you are accurately putting a full load into that same circle. If you ever start having flyers, slow down and go back to where you were still nailing the 10 ring. Finally, if your range allows it, conduct the same drill from holster retention.

Getting the gun out of the holster with the sights aligned on the target reduces the chances of a miss, and in a dangerous situation, you can’t miss fast enough to win.

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1 Response to Sighted Fire

Walkin' trails wrote:
June 10, 2012

As bad as they are, I can hit a torso sized target at 25 yards with a Ruger LCP; and out to 50 yards with a Model 36 and wadcutters. I believe there are places where point shooting has a definite speed advantage over using sights, but those distances should never go beyond 3-5 yards. And if a shooter is able to develop the consistent trigger control to not disturb the front sight alignment while pressing the trigger, the shooter will not disturb the alignment of the pistol during a point shooting session.